Star Trek Reviews

Return to season list

Star Trek Voy - Season 7

Star Trek Voy - 7x01 - Unimatrix Zero, Part II

Originally Aired: 2000-10-4

Synopsis:
The crew infiltrates Unimatrix Zero. [DVD]

My Rating - 6

Fan Rating Average - 5.6

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 21 5 0 4 2 7 24 14 14 14 11

Problems
- Tuvok's birth date of stardate 38774 isn't correct.
- Tuvok having been born on "Vulcanis Lunar Colony" would seem to contradict Spock's assertion that Vulcan has no moon. Perhaps "Vulcanis Lunar Colony" refers to a moon orbiting some other planet in the Vulcan system.
- Janeway orders Torres to "download" the virus when she meant to "upload" the virus.

Factoids
- Tuvok's daughter Asil was born in the city of T'Paal.

Remarkable Scenes
- Janeway and Torres deploying the virus.
- Voyager getting pummeled thanks to the Borg having Tuvok's access codes.
- The Borg Queen self destructing ships with drones she cannot hear.
- Borg Queen: "Assimilation turns us all into friends. In fact, it brings us so close together we can hear each other's thoughts." Boy: "Is that fun?" Borg Queen: "Yes. It's fun."
- The Borg Queen self destructing her long range tactical cube, trying to kill Janeway.

My Review
The episode ends much as you'd expect it to. Janeway finds a way to use Unimatrix Zero to attack the Borg Collective. She also finds a way to get her and her crew unassimilated. The whole episode was much too routine. It lacked the danger that episodes like TNG: The Best of Both Worlds, Voy: Scorpion, or even Voy: Dark Frontier offered. The Borg resistance was a good idea, but isn't sufficiently elaborated. Overall, between its numerous flaws and lack of originality, this episode felt more like a routine action episode than the stunning season finale / premiere that it should have been. It was quite entertaining as a two part episode, but most disappointing as a season finale / premiere.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From g@g on 2012-01-31 at 1:24am:
    Here are a few more problems:

    A) Wtf is up with the queen's drones being able to go into Unimatrix Zero (and presumably retain their connected to the hive)? It doesn't really square, does it? Isn't that the whole point - that when you go there, you maintain your individuality? If the queen figured out a special means, or constructed a special piece of hardware, that might be understandable, but there was no mention of such a thing.

    B) OK. Wtf is up with the queen's counter-plan to release her reprogrammed virus *within* Unimatrix Zero? If it's possible to release the counter-virus within Unimatrix Zero, why did Janeway and Tuvak and Voyager's pregnant chief engineer risk their necks (and then some)? Why didn't Seven just "take a nap" and release the original virus that way? If there was an explanation, it should've been shared with the audience.

    C) Why did Janeway embark on this madness in the first place? This has got to be one of her craziest plans ever. To expose herself and two of Voyager's most critical senior officers (one of them with a baby on the way) to assimilation, was pretty much *insane* - experimental neural suppressant notwithstanding. Going Borg and coming back is no small matter, as we've been reminded over and over again (think: 3x17 Unity, with the ex-Borg who'd lost limbs and were otherwise horribly deformed; 6x2 Survival Instinct, with the hopelessly linked ex-Borg "Triad"; and any number of traumatic Seven of Nine episodes starting with 4x6 The Raven, in which she had a frightening relapse and started sprouting new Borg implants like they were acne, but including also 7x2 Imperfection, when her cortical implant failed and almost took her with it, and, in hindsight, 7x18 Human Error, when she encountered her Borg "fail-safe" device.) The point is, assimilation isn't something to fool around with! You don't just visit the Collective for a weekend and come right back. This should've been obvious to Janeway. It was an utterly insane tactical decision, even for her. It made for some interesting aesthetics, but not very thoughtful command. How the doc pieced them back together is beyond me.
  • From g@g on 2012-01-31 at 10:34pm:
    I just thought of another problem. The residents of Unimatrix Zero apparently have some Neo-like control over this Matrix-like pseudo-existence. This is hinted at when Seven is informed that she "doesn't have to look like that here," meaning she can change her appearance and get rid of her remaining Borg implants (which she does, and manifests some new threads also).

    How this is done, and how far it extends, is simply not discussed, which presents plot problems later on. If they can change their appearance within Unimatrix Zero, if they have "supernatural" control over their environment, or perhaps only of their own forms, why were they such easy prey for the Queen's drones? Couldn't they have altered their appearance to, say, become twice as large, or turn into species 8472?

    (Or into tigers or machine gun wielding, trenchcoat wearing kung fu masters?)

    The Matrix-like dimension of the matter could've given the episode a bit more depth. If this was essentially a dreamworld, where were the lucid dreamers?
  • From Abigail on 2013-06-29 at 8:01pm:
    One of g@g's thoughts above also occurred to me and really bothered me during this episode. I was bothered a lot by the fact that the Queen was purportedly able to release the counter-virus within Unimatrix Zero. Like g@g said, then why couldn't the initial virus be released that way?! I had trouble getting past that during the episode.
    I hadn't thought about the last point he made - that they could change their appearance, so why not make themselves "tigers or machine-gun wielding, trenchcoat-wearing kung fu masters"? :) Another good point!
  • From Dstyle on 2015-07-30 at 12:48pm:
    Borg Queen: "There are 50,000 drones on that cube, but I can no longer hear 3 of them. <cube self destructs, image is replaced by Borg sphere> There are 2,000 drones on this sphere, but only one of them is silent to me. <sphere self destructs> Need I go on? Do you want me to stop?"
    Janeway: "No, by all means, please continue. You, ah, you don't really understand how war works, do you?"

    Neither, apparently, does Janeway.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x02 - Imperfection

Originally Aired: 2000-10-11

Synopsis:
Seven suffers a breakdown. [DVD]

My Rating - 8

Fan Rating Average - 4.29

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 58 14 3 2 4 5 9 10 17 20 18

Problems
None

Factoids
- Janeway is shot during transport and is not hurt.
- This episode was meant to be set after Voy: Drive, but the air date order was changed.

Remarkable Scenes
- Mezoti, Azan, and Rebi departing.
- Icheb expressing interest in joining Starfleet.
- Tom pointing out that the last time she took the Delta Flyer it ended up being destroyed. :)
- Janeway extracting a cortical node from a dead Borg in a Borg debris field.
- The Delta Flyer battling the alien scavengers.
- The doctor's surgery simulation.
- Seven discussing with Torres afterlife.
- Icheb disconnecting his cortical node himself so as to force the doctor to give it to Seven.
- Seven: "This debate is pointless, I won't accept the node." Icheb: "And I won't keep it." The doctor: "Someone had better use the damn thing! If it stays disconnected much longer it won't do either of you any good."
- The surgery.

My Review
Out of left field, we're shown a wonderful episode. It has all the components necessary for a good Star Trek episode. A contention, namely Seven's illness, putting her in danger. An attempt to save her that doesn't go so well, namely stealing a cortical node from a dead drone. A decent helping of action, namely the aliens who attacked the Delta Flyer at the Borg debris field. And finally a genuine moral issue concerning Icheb's radical solution to Seven's problem. I liked how mature and grown up Icheb has become and how logical his plan is. Most of all, I loved how he forced this plan upon everyone in order to save Seven's life when he realized he would fail to convince anyone. The ends justified his means, and Seven has grown much closer to Icheb as a result. Maybe our Borg action thriller that was last episode wasn't so great, but the drama in this episode is top notch.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Tony on 2008-09-04 at 7:03pm:
    A brilliant episode except for one thing: I'd like to either have the aliens in the debris field play a larger part in the story, or have them removed entirely. As is, they seem rather random, almost like the writer(s) said, "Hey, we need some action to fill this part, let's add some hostile aliens." Provided, it would seem odd not including and implant stealing scene, and it would be a dull suene if they just took the implant and left, but I feel that they could have done better. Otherwise a great episode.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x03 - Drive

Originally Aired: 2000-10-18

Synopsis:
Paris and Torres compete in a race. [DVD]

My Rating - 6

Fan Rating Average - 4.72

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 22 7 1 1 9 11 31 11 8 6 4

Problems
None

Factoids
None

Remarkable Scenes
- The teaser's little competition.
- Tom and Harry selling the idea of the race to Janeway.
- Tom's chat with Assan.
- The start of the race.
- The accident.
- Tom: "She's not a Borg, she's not a hologram, and she's not dead. Looks like you might have finally found yourself the perfect woman."
- Irina betraying Harry.
- Tom and Torres working out their problems.
- Tom and Torres discovering the bomb.
- Tom: "Will you marry me?" Computer: "Warp core breach in 15 seconds." Torres: "You're proposing now?" Tom: "It's as good a time as any."

My Review
A pleasant light hearted episode with only a minor contention resulting in Tom and Torres finally getting married. I much enjoyed the race and the marvelous eye candy sprinkled about. It was kind of a nice homage to Voy: Day of Honor that the marriage proposal required another extreme situation. The way the episode wove together the alien race event with Harry's women problems and the Tom and Torres conflict was quite nice as well. Overall very decent, slightly above Voyager's average.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From edward on 2014-04-04 at 12:30pm:
    It is a fun episode, although Harry Kim's "What the hell is going on?" is one of the worst deliveries of a line I've ever heard.
  • From parkbench on 2016-03-05 at 8:12pm:
    haha, i'm glad i'm not the only one who noticed that weird harry kim line. plus, while he's grown as an actor over the years, there was definitely a few awkward moments in this one.

    but yeah i'm a sucker for romance plots, even if they're hetero. how can you get better than a warp-core breach proposal???

    totally guessed that it was the nice-looking aliens who were sabotaging at that diplomatic meeting. a decent episode, very trek. not the best, but a decent voyager non sequitur, which is again, all you can hope for w voyager.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x04 - Repression

Originally Aired: 2000-10-25

Synopsis:
Maquis crewmembers are mysteriously attacked. [DVD]

My Rating - 4

Fan Rating Average - 3.46

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 39 4 15 6 12 10 12 7 7 5 5

Problems
- Tuvok runs out of his quarters without a comm. badge. But when we see him in the hall in the next scene, he's mysteriously acquired one.
- Janeway says Voyager is 35,000 light years from Earth in this episode. This corrects the previous incorrect statements that it was in fact 30,000 light years from Earth. Unfortunately, the previous claim was made several times across several episodes. Still, I'm more willing to believe this episode.
- A female Vulcan aboard is hard to rationalize with Voy: Counterpoint and Voy: Blood Fever. In the former, she would have had to have been shown hiding among the transporter people. And in the latter, she could have served as Vorik's new mate...

Factoids
- Voyager is said to be 35,000 light years from home in this episode.

Remarkable Scenes
- "Let me get this straight. You've gone to all this trouble to program a three dimensional environment, that projects a two dimensional image, and now you're asking me to wear these to make it look three dimensional again?" Tom: "Great, isn't it?"
- Tuvok discovering himself to be the guilty party.
- Tuvok "activating" Chakotay.
- Chakotay "activating" Torres.
- The ensuing Maquis takeover.
- Tuvok shooting Janeway with a defective phaser.
- Tuvok undoing the damage he did.
- Tuvok explaining to Janeway how he knew the phaser would be defective.

My Review
An episode with a poor premise spiced up with great acting by Tuvok and some fun action scenes. Yeah, the timing is way off for a Maquis takeover. But at the same time, this exact story couldn't have been done until Voyager reestablished contact with Starfleet. There were two remarkable details that I thought made this better than the average mind control plot. Contrast this episode with TNG: The Game where everyone is totally out of their minds. Now look at how it's done here. Tuvok, after having mind melded with everyone, simply says "pah'tem'far, b'tanay" to Chakotay. Chakotay simple responds with "understood", and in that instant he is "awakened." He says the same to Torres, who replies with "I understand." The two of them probably went on to "activate" more people. The "activated" Maquis didn't act any different than they normally do, with the exception of to whom their loyalties lied, which I thought was kind of creepy, but cool. Overall, not too bad.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Psycroptic on 2013-04-10 at 9:38pm:
    Finally an episode where tuvok gets to do something

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x05 - Critical Care

Originally Aired: 2000-11-1

Synopsis:
The Doctor is stolen. [DVD]

My Rating - 7

Fan Rating Average - 5.89

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 11 3 1 13 2 9 4 16 11 11 14

Problems
- Iridium is not radioactive.

Factoids
- As of this episode, Star Trek special effects are now done by Eden.

Remarkable Scenes
- The graphics in the teaser.
- Tom and Harry discussing Hockey with Nausicaans. Sounds nasty.
- The idiot EMH on Voyager.
- Janeway's and Tuvok's investigation.
- Janeway professing Tuvok her boyfriend.
- Voyager apprehending Gar.
- The doctor's revenge.

My Review
We've seen the doctor stolen before, but never for the purpose of using him as a doctor. This episode is uniquely remarkable in this respect, and well used he is. We're shown an alien society which has very strict policies on who can be treated in a hospital which is determined by social status. The way these policies are presented makes them seem understandable, even if a bit chilling. It's not until late in the episode that it's revealed that it might all just be Chellick's sick little scheme for using resources more efficiently. In truth, neither is made entirely clear. the most remarkable aspect about this episode is the doctor's use of torture on Chellick to invoke change. The ends most certainly justified the means, but the doctor's methods to me seemed just about as chilling as Chellick's (former?) policies. But then, you're supposed to fight fire with fire, right?

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Corporal Crust on 2007-03-23 at 6:20pm:
    A great episode. A great script. Perfect use of the doctor. Yes, it was an alien of the week episode and yes he did "do harm" to get the system to change. These are minor quams. However I believe the issue of the doctors morals was a great one to explore. Last time the doctor did harm was when his ethical subroutine was disabled. This time the harm was done under his own will. This shows his growth and his need to handle tough decisions responsibly....on a side note, Gar looks like a reject from the cats musical.
  • From jaylong on 2007-04-30 at 2:06pm:
    And why is it that I see so many fat aliens wearing metallic spandex. But yeah, still a good episode.
  • From Dstyle on 2015-07-31 at 10:57am:
    Aw man, Jim O'Heir (Jerry from Parks and Rec) was the cuckold whose wife had run off with Gar! Geez, poor guy can't catch a break anywhere!

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x06 - Inside Man

Originally Aired: 2000-11-8

Synopsis:
Voyager gets an unexpected delivery. [DVD]

My Rating - 7

Fan Rating Average - 5.64

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 12 1 2 2 5 4 8 14 17 6 3

Problems
- "Geodesic radiation" is a pretty annoying term. It would seem to connote radiation generated by gravity.
- We have yet another case of inoculation against the supposed radiation, but we've seen it so many times now that I'm gonna have to just accept that in the 24th century, an injection can do much more than it can today... somehow.
- There's another case of an upload/download term mixup by the writers in this episode.

Factoids
None

Remarkable Scenes
- Holographic Barclay appearing on board.
- Holobarclay telling Seven that on Earth she's famous.
- Barclay's conspiracy theories regarding how his transmission was blocked.
- The revelation that the Ferengi are exploiting Barclay's program.
- Barclay surprising Troi with another counseling session.
- Barclay imitating the crew.
- Admiral Paris interrogating Barclay's ex girlfriend.
- The geodesic pulse.
- Holobarclay attacking Seven.
- Barclay pretending to be Holobarclay.
- Tom and Torres picking on Harry.
- Reprogrammed Holobarclay accosting Troi.
- Rules of Acquisition; 74. Knowledge = profit.

My Review
Not quite as good as Barclay's previous three appearances, but still very good. It's remarkable how personally different Barclay's hologram was compared to the real thing. Holobarclay was so much more confident, even downright arrogant at times. I would assume this was done by Barclay intentionally, and not by the Ferengi. There are some directing issues in this otherwise wonderful episode though. Some scenes are in the wrong order, some are too long, some are too short. It would have been nice to see Holobarclay imitate the crew before we find out he's evil, and the scene when he gets angry at the doctor was just totally unnecessary. The biggest thing redeeming this episode is that it's a continuity goldmine. There are countless connections with TNG, too many to list. But all of them well placed. And finally the plot is amazingly original. The writer really knew his Trek and how to combine previously introduced elements into quite a story. With a little more care, this episode could have been among the top. But it's still quite good.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Corporal Crust on 2007-03-24 at 11:19am:
    Fun episode. However, what makes this episode interesting is also what makes it flawed. There are so many things going on script-wise that the episode never has time to "breathe" properly. We have holograms, folds, ferengi's, troi, impressions, shields, etc. The writers just have too much going on. The idea is cool, and true to trek. It just needed a little more polishing.
  • From Dstyle on 2015-07-31 at 9:26pm:
    So wait, are Barclay and Troi a package deal or something? We can't have one without the other because of some obscure contractual clause with TNG? I thought for sure this was going to be just a Barclay episode, but sure enough he crashes Troi's beach vacation to drag her into the episode too! (Also: boobs!)

    I love how the Ferengi "brace for impact" by cowering on the floor.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x07 - Body and Soul

Originally Aired: 2000-11-15

Synopsis:
The Doctor experiences actual human senses. [DVD]

My Rating - 8

Fan Rating Average - 4.58

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 58 4 4 3 3 4 8 9 17 19 22

Problems
None

Factoids
- According to Tuvok, the Vulcan libido increases with time.

Remarkable Scenes
- Seven's decidedly odd behavior once the Flyer was boarded.
- The doctor in total control of Seven's body.
- The doctor smelling Harry.
- The doctor enjoying eating.
- The cheesecake scene.
- The drunken Seven/doctor.
- The doctor as Seven: "It wasn't not my fault, Sevne's unique physiology is... unique. It doesn't react well to synthehol."
- Seven recovering her body, decidedly pissed at the doctor.
- Tom offering to make Tuvok a hologram of his wife.
- Tuvok's fun being disrupted by the battle.
- Janeway: "We're both reasonable people. I suggest a compromise. Your vessel will escort us through Lokirrim territory. That way you can keep an eye on us; make sure we don't reactivate our holodecks. The other alternative is we destroy your ship."
- Seven getting pissed at the doctor a second time.
- The waltz.
- Neelix' faux pas with Tuvok.
- Janeway sucker punching her escort and running.
- The doctor saving the life of his captors.
- Seven and the doctor making up at the end.

My Review
We have both an interesting plot concerning racism against holograms, as well as the body switching plot in the tradition of TOS: Turnabout Intruder, among others. It goes without saying that Jeri Ryan did an amazing job playing the doctor's character, and the writing for both characters was great. It was more than fitting that the doctor would immediately over indulge and Seven would object to any indulgences whatsoever. The aliens of the week weren't very interesting, but served as successful plot devices. My favorite scene with them was when Janeway arrogantly threatened to destroy her opponent's ship, then later surprise attacked them to make a clean getaway. Rarely have we seen Janeway act so maliciously. Tuvok's Pon Farr was a nice secondary plot. The writers knew this had to come some time, and having the doctor away so Paris had to treat him was very nice writing. All things considered, this is a very intelligently written episode that combines humor with danger and action very successfully. Most impressive.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Hatstacks on 2008-11-22 at 2:04am:
    Is it bad I liked the 7/Doc better than both 7 of 9 and the Doctor? Best show of the season, hands down.
  • From Hugo von Ahlenius on 2015-12-17 at 2:23am:
    Great to see the hard-headed aliens not being so hard-headed!
  • From parkbench on 2016-03-07 at 5:10am:
    oh, come on guys...really? this episode had some fun star trek moments, but it was one of the laziest i've seen in awhile.

    first of all, somehow a prisoner-captor dynamic becomes 'innocent flirting' that everyone, including other members of the alien ship casually shrug off, with no explanation. even if we assume they're sadistic and don't care about fraternising with those they kidnap, that's not how it's portrayed at all--we're just supposed to take it for granted that 'you get lonely on a ship'. riight.

    then, while it was a joy to see jeri ryan do something new--just like w/ reg in the last episode, and the doctor before that--as a plot it was also preposterous. we're to believe a jumble of photons that comes to sentience inherently has a gender identity and sexual expression? just b/c "he" is programmed to look a certain way, look how long it has taken for him to learn and naturally 'feel' other human traits as simple as sarcasm or singing. and somehow one of the most complex of those--sexual attraction and gender expression--which is by no means fixed, is just naturally read (unsurprisingly) as the doctor being a straight male...

    yes, we could retcon a decision somewhere along the way to artificially restrict his curiosity to what he perceives as the opposite sex and the 'correct' sexual attraction he feels for "his" gender, but the problem of believability is his disgust when renek or whoever tries to kiss him in 7's body. it just doesn't make sense. if anyone was to have an open-minded view of sexuality, it would be the doctor, who is curious about all human experience. i can't imagine he would have disgust for something which the show hasn't even hinted at allowing him to explore.

    and obviously, you can point to "relationships" he's had in the past, which i've had the same issues with--but episodes like this, just like his initial attraction to 7 herself, strain credulity. i'm going to go out on a limb and say that zimmerman didn't program EMH with a sexual drive per se--meaning it is, like many of us, a mix of inclinations and deliberate filtering. since this show would never explore such themes--why take them on? oh yes, it is a lazy, bottom-of-the-barrel technique to get a surefire filler/fan-cruft episode out of the way and keep moving.

    but none of that even matters since this weird melodrama is during their captivity! where is this episode going? the writers certainly don't know, other than a heaping mountain of excuses to get jeri ryan to prance around the screen in a skin-tight suit.

    so, in conclusion: the scenes jump back and forth and the pon farr plot is totally disconnected. lots of "telling" rather than "showing" moments (the doctor comparing himself and seven's respective traits in the jail cell). a weak sci-fi bro "wink-wink" premise that is barely fleshed out.

    yeah...this episode was purely fun for the technical enjoyment of actors doing new things, not for anything else.
  • From Dstyle on 2016-03-10 at 11:31am:
    Just wanted to comment to give parkbench a shout out: I'm loving all of your commentary!

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x08 - Nightingale

Originally Aired: 2000-11-22

Synopsis:
Harry Kim takes command of a ship. [DVD]

My Rating - 5

Fan Rating Average - 4.3

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 9 5 3 5 8 10 8 5 3 3 2

Problems
- So if the "passengers" aboard Nightingale were all cloaking tech scientists and not just passengers after all, how come they knew nothing of ship operations?
- Was the border of Annari space ridiculously close to the planet Voyager landed on? They seemed to cross the border without ever reaching warp speed in short order...

Factoids
- Another ship landing.

Remarkable Scenes
- Janeway complaining about the extended maintenance stay.
- Harry saving the alien ship.
- Harry complaining about still being an Ensign.
- Icheb concerned that Torres is attracted to him.
- Icheb confronting Torres about her "attraction."

My Review
On the surface, this is an above average episode, but an analysis reveals several weak points. The technical problems which I've outlined in the problems section contribute quite negatively to the plot, seeing as how they do much to ruin the premise. I also was annoyed that the Nightingale was just a reuse of the Maquis raider. There isn't much excuse for that in today's high budget Trek. Finally, I was rather annoyed Janeway didn't put a stop to Harry's mission. It had obvious negative consequences for Voyager, and even considering the actual events of the episode, there's no way to be sure Harry was in fact helping the "right" side. It would have been much smarter for Voyager to stay out of the conflict, complete the trade negotiations, and leave peacefully, rather than being escorted out of the combat zone having not completed repairs and not made any trades. There are several nice details about the episode though which keep me from rating it any lower. I loved the plot concerning Icheb's mistaken romance. I especially love the way it ended. Torres just played along and let Icheb believe whatever he wanted to believe so she didn't have to explain to him what her actual motives were. Seeing Kim complain about his rank and get some time to play captain on another ship was nice too. And to be honest, despite the inherent flaws, I much enjoyed the "smuggle the cloaking device behind the lines" story. In short, this episode is a lot of fun if you don't think about it too much. So I tend to be fairly forgiving.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Mitch89 on 2013-02-20 at 4:00pm:
    I like that Harry Kim finally gets to shine as a leader. He's right when he says he'd be a Lt Cmr if they were back in the Alpha Quadrant. Being passed up for promotion over Tom Paris also seemed a little harsh.
  • From zook on 2014-01-06 at 9:23pm:
    Ron Glass, who plays Loken here, also played Shepherd Book on "Firefly". Not exactly Star Trek trivia, but you do have reviews for Firefly on this site. Glass even has a similar hairdo. I wonder if the same crazy thing happens when Loken undoes his ponytail ;)

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x09 - Flesh and Blood, Part I

Originally Aired: 2000-11-29

Synopsis:
Voyager's holo-technology comes back to haunt them. [DVD]

My Rating - 4

Fan Rating Average - 4.62

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 14 3 13 2 3 10 10 10 6 6 5

Problems
None

Factoids
- Tylium is said to be used as a power source for Hirogen ships. This is a reference to Battlestar Galactica on which it was used by the Galactica as a power source too.

Remarkable Scenes
- The doctor pressing Chakotay to let him take a shuttle to attend the symposium.
- Seven shutting down the hologrid, revealing the hirogen bodies.
- The doctor: "I'm a doctor, not an engineer." Count 35 for "I'm a doctor, not a (blah)" style lines, which McCoy was famous for.

My Review
I was a little annoyed that Voyager seems to be vastly more powerful than Hirogen ships now, a big change since Voy: Hunters. Holographic rights are the center of attention in this episode and Janeway puts forth a remarkably Draconian view on the subject. Finally, the doctor makes an amazingly stupid decision, betraying his crew like that. Flaws notwithstanding, this was a fairly successful action episode. It was nice to see that not all Hirogen are hunters; not all Klingons are warriors likewise. While this is a fun action episode with a fair amount of eye candy spread throughout, the flaws do add up and I can't justify giving it any higher a rating.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Lennier on 2008-05-02 at 1:53am:
    In addition to Tylium, the mention of Ovions and Boray are references to the original Battlestar Galactica.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x10 - Flesh and Blood, Part II

Originally Aired: 2000-11-29

Synopsis:
The renegade Holograms abduct Torres. [DVD]

My Rating - 7

Fan Rating Average - 5.18

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 10 1 13 5 1 6 7 14 5 7 8

Problems
None

Factoids
- This episode (both parts) features a myriad of familiar species from all corners of the galaxy. Alpha quadrant humans and Bajorans, beta quadrant Romulans and Klingons, as well as gamma quadrant Jem'Hadar, and delta quadrant Borg.

Remarkable Scenes
- Voyager hiding in the wake of a Hirogen ship.
- Tom regarding following the Hirogen ship's rear end: "Not exactly the scenic route is it?" Chakotay: "We're not here for the view."
- Torres: "It may be the warriors who get the glory but it's the engineers who build societies."
- Iden revealing that he's the center of a religion he created.
- Voyager's sneak attack on the Hirogen.
- The holograms hunting the Hirogen on the surface.

My Review
Okay, so Voyager is a bit more careful about fighting Hirogen ships now. They seem to be a little more threatening too. Maybe the ship Voyager defeating last episode was just a weaker model or something. The issues the first part thoroughly failed to deal with are tackled here. Janeway finally realizes that much of this situation is her fault and the doctor realizes the idiocy of his decision. Additionally, part two loses none of the nice action and none of the nice eye candy. As a result of all this, part two is quite a bit more successful. The only negative aspect to the story is Iden, who turned into a megalomaniac. It would have been a much better episode if Iden and his followers weren't so clearly portrayed as bad guys. And the whole "rescuing the mindless holograms" scene was just unnecessary. The two episode as a whole probably would have been better if it were compressed into a single episode, simply removing the bad elements.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Rick on 2013-04-21 at 12:12pm:
    So the doctor blatantly commits treason and Janeway just says no problem, dont worry about it. She says, "maybe youve become just as responsible as those of us that are flesh and blood... how can I punish you for being who you are."

    This has to be one of the worst lines in all of Star Trek. He betrays the crew and commits treason and has to bear no responsibility for his actions. When humans do this you are locked up for life or killed. So the supposedly oppressed doctor can leave the ship to become an opera star or outright betray the crew whenever he wants. Great message
  • From Dstyle on 2015-08-04 at 4:24pm:
    Thank God for formulaic story structure! For a second there I was worried the Bajoran hologram wouldn't betray the doctor's trust in an obvious and dramatic fashion, or that Torres wouldn't be able to convince the Cardassian hologram to switch sides through a little casual real talk, or that the diminutive Hirogen engineer wouldn't strike off to help build the new holographic future at the end. Lucky for us the writers followed the formula to a T, saving us the trouble of being pleasantly surprised by a creative or innovative story structure! Thanks, Voyager!

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x11 - Shattered

Originally Aired: 2001-1-17

Synopsis:
Chakotay experiences different eras of Voyager's history. [DVD]

My Rating - 5

Fan Rating Average - 6.14

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 10 2 6 2 5 8 6 7 8 13 17

Problems
- You've got to wonder how ships systems can possibly function under such circumstances.

Factoids
None

Remarkable Scenes
- Naomi with her LCARS puzzle.
- Janeway taking apart her replicator.
- Janeway: "Once, a long time ago, I called this replicator a glorified toaster. It never forgave me."
- The doctor complaining about his underappreciation and his lack of mobility.
- Janeway and Chakotay stumbling on a future Icheb and Naomi.
- Chakotay walking through the ship, moving through time.
- Janeway: "Sounds like it's going to be one disaster after another on this ship."
- The whole Chaotica scene.
- Chaotica: "Eighth? Everyone knows there are only five dimensions."
- Janeway: "The delta quadrant is a death trap!"
- Rules of Acquisition; ?. A good lie is easier to believe than the truth.

My Review
So, what did I think of this episode? Sorry. Can't tell you. Temporal Prime Directive. Has it occurred to anyone that this has got to be the biggest Trek inside joke around? Boy, if I were a kid attending school in the 24th century Federation, I'd use that excuse all the time. "Why's your homework not done?" My response? "I can't tell you. Temporal prime directive." Joking aside, the episode itself is pretty funny. While completely implausible, it's fun to watch Chakotay wander through Voyager's different time periods. This episode was also a nicely clever way to bring back Seska and the Kazon. I am only curious as to why Seven of Nine was so willing to help Voyager. She should have been more like Seska for her behavior to be consistent. In the end, it's just another reset button though. Voyager has done these to death. At least it's a light hearted entertaining one though.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Jem Hadar on 2010-07-06 at 5:30pm:
    Love this episode, one of my favourites from all of Voyager.
  • From joe on 2016-06-19 at 4:34pm:
    Out of all of Trek, Voyager is the worst offender of the time travel non-sense. The is the best example of VOY over-doing the temporal silliness.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x12 - Lineage

Originally Aired: 2001-1-24

Synopsis:
Torres worries about her unborn child. [DVD]

My Rating - 6

Fan Rating Average - 5.12

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 20 6 3 2 4 20 8 10 7 11 12

Problems
None

Factoids
- A normal Klingon pregnancy lasts 30 weeks.

Remarkable Scenes
- Icheb speculating that Torres' pregnancy is in fact a parasitic infection.
- The doctor accidentally revealing the baby's gender.
- Torres desperately trying to get everyone's support in resequencing her baby's DNA so it is no longer any part Klingon.
- The revelation that Torres tampered with the EMH.
- Torres telling the story of why her father left.

My Review
A revisit of Torres' personal conflict shown in Voy: Faces, among other episodes. What's interesting about this episode is that it has no secondary plot, and doesn't in fact need one. The issue of racial, or rather species (im)purity is obviously very real in the 24th century Federation, and this episode explores the concept well. I like the way this episode shows us how much the characters and crew have matured over the years. An episode like this couldn't have been done in the first season. I also like how not only did the entire episode focus on a single plot thread, it was something of a bottle show. It's nice to explore the characters every once in a while instead of showing us alien or anomaly of the week. And it's done well here.

No fan commentary yet.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x13 - Repentance

Originally Aired: 2001-1-31

Synopsis:
Voyager transports prisoners. [DVD]

My Rating - 4

Fan Rating Average - 5.36

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 12 2 12 3 4 7 11 9 8 12 9

Problems
- Why didn't Voyager share the results of the doctor's research with the Nygeans so that future birth defects could be corrected before they become a problem?

Factoids
None

Remarkable Scenes
- Seven of Nine's valiant escape.
- Tuvok shooting the prisoner through the doctor.
- The doctor: "This is a Federation starship, not the barge of the dead."
- The doctor curing the neurological disorder in Iko's brain which caused him to be violent.
- Iko ending the prisoner revolt, proving he's changed even to the warden.

My Review
An episode dealing with prisoner ethics. Is an eye for an eye wrong? Should the death penalty be exacted on murderers? What if it's discovered that the murder was only committed due to mental illness? And what if that mental illness can be cured? The episode doesn't much deal with these issues other than skimming over the obvious. It's obvious Iko should not have been executed. And it's obvious that people like him should be cured. Unfortunately, no attempt is made to check to see if any of the other prisoners suffered from this condition, nor did Voyager share this medical finding with the Nygeans for some reason. Instead we get character drama, some pointless action, and more of Seven feeling guilty about being formerly Borg. I would have preferred an episode less unoriginal, but the one we got wasn't too bad.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Tallifer on 2011-05-10 at 6:10am:
    This episode was well done: it handled the questions of guilt, injustice, capital punishment, restitution and revenge, the rights of victims and convicts.

    Just as it is obvious to the reviewer that Eeko should not have been executed, it is equally obvious to me that he was justly executed: and the episode presented both cases fairly. Imagine being that family sitting there, exposed in front of a crowd of strangers and being pressured to forgo the justice previously granted them.
  • From conor on 2012-05-22 at 8:40pm:
    "This is a Federation starship, not the barge of the dead." doesn't this count for "I'm a doctor, not a (blah)" style lines, which McCoy was famous for.
    because you have used this example close to this before

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x14 - Prophecy

Originally Aired: 2001-2-7

Synopsis:
Torres' unborn child may be a Klingon "Savior." [DVD]

My Rating - 7

Fan Rating Average - 6.32

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 8 3 2 1 4 8 6 11 24 14 4

Problems
None

Factoids
None

Remarkable Scenes
- The battle with the Klingons.
- the Klingons blowing up their own ship.
- Neelix and Tuvok becoming bunk mates.
- Neelix: "Good! Because I promise you we're going to have fun, Mr. Vulcan. I learned some Klingon drinking songs."
- Torres meeting with the Klingons.
- Kohlar: "Where are the images of Kahless? Where is your family crest?" Torres: "They clashed with the carpet."
- The doctor authorizing Kim to have sexual relations with the Klingon females. Nice connection with Voy: The Disease ;)
- Tom accepting the Klingon challenge.
- Neelix taking Harry's woman. ;)
- The fight on the bridge.
- The aftermath of Neelix' relationship with the Klingon woman in Tuvok's quarters.

My Review
A smart episode. The timing is right, Voyager is over half way home, close enough to encounter a Klingon generational ship. I am just disappointed that they are eliminated at the end of this episode. They're guided to a new home and never seen again. This episode suffers from the same problem that Equinox did in this respect. It would have been nice to keep the Equinox and her crew around. Likewise it would have been nice to keep the Klingon ship and her crew around. The episode bears nice continuity with Voy: Lineage, just two episodes ago. I'm glad the writers found a way to do something with Torres' pregnancy beyond the initial episode. Overall, I thought this episode ended up being much better than and not as silly as it could have been. Sure, it does seem the writers are pouring too much alpha quadrant into the writing lately, but they're being very careful about it.

No fan commentary yet.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x15 - The Void

Originally Aired: 2001-2-14

Synopsis:
Voyager is pulled into a void. [DVD]

My Rating - 8

Fan Rating Average - 4.77

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 49 1 2 2 3 7 1 8 18 23 14

Problems
None

Factoids
- The Vaadwaur, or at least the remnants of the Vaadwaur are mentioned as being present in the void.

Remarkable Scenes
- Seven chiding Chakotay for wanting to change his wine and Paris for wanting some salt regarding the meal she prepared.
- Seven: "In six years you haven't chosen a name for yourself but you've given Fantôme one in a few days." The doctor: "Choosing the right name for myself is extremely difficult. I'm a complex individual." Seven: "And Fantôme isn't?"
- Seven of Nine teaching Fantôme to communicate.
- Janeway forming an alliance.
- The native void species communicating through music.
- The alliance making it through the vortex.

My Review
Rarely do we ever see such brilliant displays of the spirit of Star Trek. This episode could have been just another boring anomaly of the week episode, but instead we're given a character driven drama depicting the struggles many groups of people trying to survive in a barren environment. Indeed, survival is impossible unless you prey off of the other prisoners. Janeway's idealism is exactly the kind of thinking which made the Federation so great in the first place. Pooling the resources of many ships in the void was exactly what was necessary for a long term survival plan. I most enjoyed Janeway's dedication to her principles even when things seemed grim. In the end, we had five alien cultures (including the Hierarchy) cooperating toward their common goal of escape. Probably the most impressive aspect of the show are the native aliens of the void. Initially regarded as vermin, or parasites by the other aliens, and an unintelligent burden to some of the Starfleet crew, Seven and the doctor devise a way to communicate with them, and they repay Voyager for their kindness. The message there is to never discriminate. All things considered, this episode is kind of like a much improved version of TAS: The Time Trap. I wonder if the author was inspired by that episode.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Pete Miller on 2007-03-26 at 4:11pm:
    So Janeway will use the research from Crell Moset, even though it was obtained through illicit means. Yet she won't use the device that the aliens got by killing some other people?

    Seems like another Janeway contradiction to me.
  • From Jane on 2012-06-26 at 4:44pm:
    Pete miller you have commented negatively on every Voyager episode omg!! get a life or go back to watching DS9 seriously.
  • From Psycroptic on 2013-05-28 at 10:18pm:
    He has a point, she's a very inconsistent character
  • From Dstyle on 2015-08-10 at 3:29pm:
    I watched this episode over a week ago and I can't stop thinking about those awesome aliens native to the Void. Where did they come from? I imagine they were originally a space-faring species that got stuck in the Void millions and millions of year ago, and over time evolved and adapted to become the species they are today. But there are only so many ships in the Void, so there can't be many of this species around. Fascinating.

    You know what else I find fascinating? The discussion that has cropped up in the comments to this episode (if you can call three comments spread out over the course six years a "discussion"). I've been thinking a lot about Janeway as I've watched this series and read reactions to the episodes, and there seems to be a lot of anti-Janeway comments: she's a bad leader, she's inconsistent, she makes bad decisions, etc. Some of this is a result of the show being a bit of a disappointment in general: some great premises, but uneven writing and execution. But you know what other show was sometimes inconsistent and uneven? Star Trek: The Next Generation. I bet we can all think of some bad TNG epsiodes where someone was acting horribly out of character, or someone was terribly inconsistent or made some questionable leadership decisions with zero consequences. Yet you don't see comments about what a bad leader Picard is or how he makes contradictory decisions. I don't see a lot of people who dislike Picard because of these episodes, but I do see people hating on Janeway for the same sins. When Picard makes a frustrating or questionable leadership decision he is either given the benefit of the doubt--the issues are seldom black and white, after all--or the blame is placed on the writers (see TNG 2x15 "Pen Pals" for an example of some of this: a thoroughly awful episode IMO). So what's the difference?

    You all know what the difference is. Janeway is a woman. I know folks tend to get all offended and clutch their pearls when anyone dares be so impolite to suggest that maaaaaaybe, just maaaaybe, they're being a little unconsciously sexist. But I definitely see sexism at play when I look at the ways all the different Star Trek captains are discusses by the fans. Picard has a bad episode, people blame the writers. Janeway has a bad episode, she's a bad, inconsistent captain.

    Here's a fun game you can try: if you're one of the folks who dislikes Janeway, whenever she does something you don't like pretend it was an episode of TNG and Jean-Luc Picard was the captain. Still a bad decision? Or was it, perhaps, the actions of a complex and fallible character? Or just bad writing? Rinse and repeat as needed.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x16 - Workforce, Part I

Originally Aired: 2001-2-21

Synopsis:
The crew works on an unknown world. [DVD]

My Rating - 8

Fan Rating Average - 4.31

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 53 2 1 3 2 3 8 11 12 13 16

Problems
None

Factoids
- The Quarran ships are a reuse of the Breen ships from DS9.

Remarkable Scenes
- The sight of the impressive Quarren city.
- Janeway to her supervisor: "I can already tell it's going to be much better than my last job."
- Seven the "efficiency monitor."
- Tom having discipline problems
- Tuvok, the funny man, a joke teller.
- The doctor as the Emergency Command Hologram. Nice reference to Voy: Tinker Tenor Doctor Spy.
- The sight of Neelix' ship leaving the shuttle bay.
- Neelix and Chakotay "abducting" Torres.

My Review
Impressive. Voyager has been abusing two part episodes lately, squandering time. But this is a case where the two part episode is used well. Part one is sufficiently complex, giving us many sets and many problems. I was very pleased to see the doctor get to play Emergency Command Hologram for real, fantastic continuity with Voy: Tinker Tenor Doctor Spy. The way he and eventually Chakotay, Harry, and Neelix all deal with the problem was very professional and a lot of fun to watch. Part one has thus far made great use of Voyager's diverse elements and continuity. Besides the ECH, we see the return of Neelix' shuttle, Torres' pregnancy is used in the story again, Tom's delinquency is made an issue, Janeway's desire for a relationship shows up again, and even Seven of Nine's efficiency fetish plays a role. It's remarkable how the characters were selectively brainwashed so the essence of who they were remained, even if their memories were tampered with. The episode's climax is exciting, leaving us with a (most literal) cliffhanger after Chakotay had been discovered and Torres "abducted." Finally, the graphics in this episode were spectacular, some of the best ever shown.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Dstyle on 2015-08-05 at 5:42pm:
    Despite possessing the complete technical knowledge of the Borg Collective, the aliens of the week decide to make Seven of Nine their new Efficiency Officer. Geez, if you're going to criminally underutilize her, why not just put her in charge of handing out paper towels in the bathroom?

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x17 - Workforce, Part II

Originally Aired: 2001-2-28

Synopsis:
Chakotay tries to rescue his lost comrades. [DVD]

My Rating - 7

Fan Rating Average - 5.23

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 20 2 20 5 6 6 7 21 17 7 17

Problems
None

Factoids
- The reactors on the Quarren planet are said to use Tylium fuel. Another reference to Battlestar Galactica.

Remarkable Scenes
- The doctor outwitting the Quarren ships.
- Remarkable technobabble: "Triaxialating frequency on a covariant subspace band."
- Seven: "More than a hundred skilled employees, most of them the same species, acquired in a single day during a labor shortage?"
- Yerid investigating the conspiracy.
- Ravoc uncovering the conspiracy.
- Voyager coming under attack when they tried to rescue their crew.
- Kim outwitting the Quarren ships.

My Review
Not quite as exciting as the first part as we by now well knew exactly what was going on. Watching Ravoc so slowly (ad nauseam) uncover the source of the conspiracy was the weakest use of time yet displayed in the episode. However, the extensive guest character involvement was also still quite to the episode's advantage. I felt we really got to know Qurren well, and it was nice to see the crew's efforts to rescue their comrades finally begin to show some progress after much trial and error. And like part one, part two manages to display more spectacular graphics. Workforce was an unusual episode on any scale, but definitely a surprisingly nice treat and a gem of season seven.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Hugo on 2016-03-03 at 4:55pm:
    I liked Yerid, the Quarren investigator, reminded me of that detective in Caprica.

    The displays in the power plant looked very cheap btw...

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x18 - Human Error

Originally Aired: 2001-3-7

Synopsis:
Seven experiences more emotions. [DVD]

My Rating - 4

Fan Rating Average - 4.68

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 11 5 6 16 7 8 6 6 9 6 7

Problems
None

Factoids
- The teaser of this episode is the shortest ever on Voyager at only 43 seconds long.

Remarkable Scenes
- Seven's opening piano performance.
- The doctor: "Rock-a-bye baby, in the spacedock. When the core blows, the shuttle will rock. When the hull breaks, the shuttle will fall. And down will come baby, shuttle and all."
- Seven discussing hairstyles with Torres...
- Seven: "Slice these vegetables transversely in five millimeter increments."
- The metronome scene.
- Seven's medical emergency and the doctor stumbling on her fantasy.
- Seven disarming the alien weapon.

My Review
Great continuity with Voy: Unimatrix Zero. I was wondering if they'd pick up on Seven's behavioral changes whilst within Unimatrix Zero and thankfully they did. Unfortunately this episode ends with the biggest anticlimax in Voyager history for which I subtract points. I couldn't believe the way the episode just ended well before it began. I was totally enthralled in the story of Seven of Nine finally becoming truly human, jumping over that last hurdle to humanity. But instead of letting the doctor treat her and instead of picking up on the real Chakotay's advances, she dismisses them both right out of hand so she could remain a workaholic. How sad. This episode parallels TNG: Lessons in that it features some more extremely beautiful piano music. I'll never forget the Moonlight Sonata scene in the Jeffries Tubes in that episode. Likewise I'll never forget the metronome scene between Seven and holographic Chakotay here. With only eight episodes left, the plot thread left wide open in this episode is at the top of my list for loose threads to resolve. Never end a story this way!

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From JemHadar359 on 2008-04-07 at 11:55pm:
    I'm not sure off the top of my head, but wasn't the teaser for "Scorpion Part I" shorter?
  • From Nicholas on 2009-01-17 at 8:21pm:
    I found one thing puzzling.

    Apparently Seven has this Borg implant that causes her to shut down whenever she is about to experience higher emotions. As this has never been noticed before, is the breakup with her holographic toyboy more emotional for her than ANYTHING she has experienced over the last three and a half years, including Icheb nearly sacrificing himself for her, One, John Kelly, all her mother-daughter moments with Janeway, memories of her parents and so forth?
  • From g@g on 2012-01-28 at 3:58am:
    You know what, this episode rocked. Somehow I didn't feel totally let down by the "anticlimax." The episode is called "Human Error," afterall. All things cannot end well, and people can't always make the right courageous, well-balanced decisions. Human beings, even ex-borg, don't progress linearly - there are a lot of steps backward, and the end is rarely certain or even clear.

    Anyway, I'm rambling, but I second the reviewer about the most memorable piano scene and the other good qualities, and disagree about the ending being thoroughly lousy (especially in hindsight, having scene where this all leads in the season finale).
  • From Dstyle on 2015-08-07 at 4:41pm:
    I agree with the previous comment: to consider the ending to be a disappointing "anti-climax" misses the point of the ending. It's easy to take emotional risks when you have nothing on the line; it is far more human to be nervous and guarded in real life. We saw this once already in this episode, when Seven socialized and gave a toast at the holographic baby shower, yet made a weak excuse to miss the real one.

    I found the ending to be highly relatable: how many times, as a young teenager dealing with new and confusing emotions, did I imagine scenarios where I would approach my love interest boldly and confidently, only to waver in real life and avoid the encounter entirely? I imagine anyone who was a teenager had similar experiences. This is Seven's middle school dance, except she's at the dance with adults who all already know how to navigate these types of situations.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x19 - Q2

Originally Aired: 2001-4-11

Synopsis:
Q and his son visit Voyager. [DVD]

My Rating - 7

Fan Rating Average - 5.23

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 39 5 7 12 7 10 10 7 10 43 16

Problems
None

Factoids
- According to Icheb, Captain Kirk completed his historic five year mission in 2270
- Q and his son Q2 were played by father and son actors as well. Q = John de Lancie. Q2 = Keegan de Lancie.

Remarkable Scenes
- Janeway: "How many more chapters are there?" Icheb: "Thirty four." Janeway: This was supposed to be a twenty minute presentation." Icheb: "I was trying to be thorough."
- Q and Q2 appearing.
- Q2: "I've been through every deck on this ship. And do you know what I've seen? Bipeds pushing buttons. Bipeds replacing relays. Bipeds running diagnostics."
- Q2 removing Seven of Nine's cloths...
- Janeway: "Coffee. Black." Computer: "Make it yourself."
- Q2 having 3 Borg cubes attack Voyager.
- Q getting advice from Janeway.
- Q2: "What was that for?" Q: "What's wrong? You didn't enjoy life as an Oprelian amoeba?" Q2: "No! I was shapeless and slimy. The only thing to eat was paramecia!"
- Q2 asking Seven if he can see her naked again...
- Chakotay making Q2 solve a diplomatic problem.
- Q: "Potential isn't going to be enough for the Continuum." Janeway: "Then what will be enough?" Q: "The boy needs to display nothing less than exemplary Qness." Janeway: "And what exactly is Qness?" Q: "Oh it's impossible for your minuscule mind to comprehend."
- Q2 stealing the Delta flyer and blowing up the door on the shuttle bay.
- The alien Q2 fired upon revealing himself to actually be Q.
- Q rewarding Janeway by taking two years off her journey.

My Review
Marvelously hilarious. It is slightly annoying that the Q are being used for nothing more than comic relief, and this likely being the final Q episode is hardly a good send off. For some reason on TNG Q felt the need to be profound, and on Voyager he felt the need to be funny. With the exception of his first appearance on Voyager in Voy: Death Wish, which was one of Voyager's best episodes, all his appearances on Voyager have been little silly. This episode being absolutely no exception. And even Voy: Death Wish was quite silly compared to some of Q's TNG appearances. (Okay, I guess Q was trivialized on TNG a bit too.) That said, I don't mind it so much, it's just worth pointing out. It was a nice idea to have Keegan de Lancie play as Q's son, seeing as how he's the son of the actor playing Q. It made their interactions that much more realistic. It's interesting to compare and contrast this episode with the last one. Voy: Human Error was a profound character analysis of Seven of Nine. This episode is nothing more than cheap humor with a rather basic lesson in morality. Nevertheless, as fond as I was for Voy: Human Error's basic plot, the ending was quite lacking. Voy: Human Error was a better story for the most part, but this episode was much more entertaining, and lacked the fatal flaw of an anticlimax. Besides, it's fun to laugh, and this episode has lots of humor.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From peter on 2015-09-22 at 3:36pm:
    I never liked the Q-stories of the TNG and otherwise, because they are fanstasy and not SF. Only they are fun due to John de Lancie who is a very gifted and funny actor. Otherwise the whoke Q universe is complete stupidity. I wonder why the original series never ever came up which such utter nonsense and shite
  • From Hugo on 2016-03-17 at 3:43pm:
    I was neither impressed nor amused. Part of the fun with Q on TNG was the chemistry Picard/Q - there is not much of that with Janeway. Loads of overacting in the first part of it too. Then of course, the whole idea of these omnipotent beings is over the top.

    I reacted to a few things that I found sexist, that is not usually in Trek - like Q jr q-uing away Seven's clothes (I liked her reaction though!), and the skimpily clad go-go dancers in Engineering.

    The good from this ep: Itcheb, great acting!

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x20 - Author, Author

Originally Aired: 2001-4-18

Synopsis:
The Doctor works on his new holo-novel. [DVD]

My Rating - 8

Fan Rating Average - 4.59

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 47 3 2 2 15 6 6 10 11 13 21

Problems
None

Factoids
None

Remarkable Scenes
- The intro to the doctor's holonovel is a nice bit of special effects.
- Tom playing in the doctor's inflammatory holonovel.
- Torres playing in the doctor's holonovel, complete with the mobile emitter backpack.
- Harry finding out his character is a hypochondriac.
- Janeway watching her character condemn the doctor.
- The doctor trying to justify his story to the crew.
- Harry explaining to his parents why promotions are in short supply when there is only one ship in the delta quadrant.
- The doctor experiencing Paris' sabotaged version of the doctor's holonovel.
- The doctor: "My publisher assures me he won't distribute the program until he receives the revised version." Torres: "That must be the one where we assimilate the Borg and take over the quadrant."
- Torres talking to her father.
- Broht legally stealing the rights to the doctor's holonovel, which satires the lack of holographic rights in the Federation, because the author (the doctor), as a hologram, has no legal rights in the Federation.
- The arbitrator contending that the doctor is not a real person.
- Annika meeting her aunt Irene Hansen.
- The doctor winning the case gaining the right to control his own work.
- The scene on the dilithium refinery.

My Review
Lots of mud gets thrown at this episode for being mindless entertainment and in some ways downright offensive. But I personally enjoyed the doctor's absurd recreation. I also think that it's important that the doctor learned not to use such a provocative tone in his writing so as not to offend his friends. The absurd recreation while a fine plot in and of itself is expanded into an episode with a much more serious tone though, which is why I ended up liking it so much. Voy: Author, Author becomes for holograms what TNG: The Measure of a Man was for androids. Granted this episode lacks the level of profoundness the TNG episode had, it retains quite a bit of it. The ending of the episode more than peaked my interest, and I thought it was handled well. What better irony is there than Broht stealing the doctor's work, which satires the lack of holographic rights in the Federation, because the author, the doctor is a hologram and has no legal rights in the Federation! The timing is perfect too. We've seen so many episodes already dealing with holographic persecution, such as Voy: Flesh and Blood, among others. I was waiting for an episode that would spearhead the issue, tackling it once and for all. I'm annoyed that the arbitrator would not declare the doctor a person, closing the issue once and for all, but then again for the sake of the plot I'm kind of glad he didn't. You don't want to do too much in a single episode, now do you? ;) Overall, I think this episode is quite underrated.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Corporal Crust on 2007-04-01 at 4:54am:
    I felt this episode was quite terrible. It tried to be too much, and in the process was ultimately nothing. Had the writers not banked so much in the knee-slapping hilarity of masterwork, "Photons be Free", we could have had a decent story. I guess we had to get to holo-rights soon or later. Since we're six episodes away from no more voyager, this would be far to much later. Better time would have been spent on the doctor logging time in the holodeck for his first sexual experience, or medical breakthough. Two hyposprays down....way down.
  • From Alec on 2010-01-16 at 3:28am:
    I think this episode portrays Tuvok's legal skills (and anyone else who assisted) very poorly if they could not even mention Data's case in TNG: The Measure of a Man. It seems as though referencing that case would be an extremely obvious and effective tactic.
  • From zook on 2011-08-21 at 10:14pm:
    No matter what you think of this episode, you have to love Tulok's evil Vulcan goatee. Nice nod to TOS.
  • From Rick on 2014-02-21 at 6:44pm:
    Same flaw as in Measure of a Man: even if the Doctor was ruled not to have rights, then Starfleet would own the rights because they own the Doctor. There is no way for the publisher to win.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x21 - Friendship One

Originally Aired: 2001-4-25

Synopsis:
Starfleet orders Voyager to locate the titular probe. [DVD]

My Rating - 2

Fan Rating Average - 4.69

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 9 6 7 2 6 8 7 18 4 2 3

Problems
None

Factoids
- Admiral Hendricks claims Janeway has made first contact with more species than anyone since James Kirk.

Remarkable Scenes
- Janeway discussing the Voth with Admiral Hendricks.
- Carey's death.

My Review
Weak. Lt. Carey appeared in season one, then was remarkably absent from future episodes. They brought him back for episodes that dealt with "Voyager's past" connoting that he was lost some time in season one. Now it's revealed that he's always been around and that he never died... only so they could kill him off here! His death was utterly pointless and Janeway's speech about how exploration at the cost of loss of life being unacceptable is just downright offensive. Every starship we've seen on Star Trek has lost life in the name of exploration. That's what makes it so "bold" when they go "where no one has gone before." It's not unrealistic that Janeway, who has just lost a friend (okay, maybe that's a stretch seeing as how he was already a ghost) might be feeling shaky about her convictions but such feelings could have been expressed better. On the other hand, the idea of having Voyager go on a mission to retrieve Friendship One was a good one. I did indeed like the premise of the episode. It's just a shame that instead of getting a discussion about this being the reason the Prime Directive exists, all we got was a dumb hostage story instead.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Hugo on 2016-04-08 at 3:26pm:
    Not too shabby - I enjoyed it quite a bit. The whole setup with the disaster and the connection to the federation was bad, but I enjoyed the rest - felt like classic trek, for a change.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x22 - Natural Law

Originally Aired: 2001-5-2

Synopsis:
Seven and Chakotay are stranded. [DVD]

My Rating - 1

Fan Rating Average - 5.11

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 9 5 6 8 4 3 4 8 8 8 7

Problems
None

Factoids
Borg Species Designation: 312, name unknown. They used Tetryon based technology.

Remarkable Scenes
- Tom getting stuck with piloting lessons.
- The Ledosians attacking Voyager.
- Tom diverting from his "training" to go on Janeway's "mission."

My Review
Another disappointment. I expected since the teaser that this episode would make Seven begin to pursue the real Chakotay, but it never happened. Additionally, I'm disappointed at the unprecedented level of arrogance displayed in this episode. What right did Voyager have to make decisions for the Ventu? If I were Janeway, yes, I would have wanted my deflector back. But I would have shared with the Ledosians how to defeat the barrier. It just made no sense that the Ventu should be shielded from "medicine, infrastructure, and education" based on some misguided belief that their primitive culture should be preserved. The Ledosians had every right to be angry.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Kenobie on 2011-05-09 at 11:51am:
    There was a plant\fruit that made a yellowish rock produce fire. Hmmm... How unlikely would something like that really be? Just imagine that there are fruit juice's that create fire when coming into contact with a certain type of rock. How many natural forest fires would that produce.
  • From Jadzia Guinan Smith on 2015-07-18 at 4:36pm:
    A pretty boring episode. I gave it a 3. I can even see someone finding it dull enough to give it a rating of 1 – but I disagree with almost ALL of the specifics of your review.

    You are conflating the Ventus' right to have opportunities for contact with outsiders with the Ledosians' "right" to exploit the Ventus' world and impose their own brand of technological "advancement" on them by force. Those are two very different things.

    What exactly gives the Ledosians "every right to be angry"? NOTHING was taken from them! They didn't breach the shield, Voyager did! How did they suddenly develop "rights" over something that Voyager made possible? Oh, and by the way, they ATTACKED Voyager after agreeing to allow the shield repairs. It was Janeway who had a right be angry! She had no obligation to share any technology with the Ledosians and every right (and maybe even a duty) to repair the damage she caused to the shield in order to get her people and her deflector out.

    However, I do agree that there's a weird sort of reverse snobbery (or the "noble savage" conceit) in deciding there’s value in the Ventus' way of life. But it’s not particular to this episode – it’s pretty much the nature of the Prime Directive. Part of me has always been troubled the paternalism implied in it. Civilization has always benefited from trade and travel and contact with foreigners. The accidental and spontaneous inputs of the universe are ultimately responsible for all change, whether cosmic, or biological, or technological, or social. Still, it is also sort of understandable that they have concerns about overwhelming an unprepared society with technology beyond its comprehension. Either way, it’s probably a little late to start questioning the Prime Directive! But it’s hard to see the justification in your indictment of the “arrogance” in this episode without the indicting the directive itself.

    In any case, if you pay close attention, Janeway's decision is NOT based on a positive, substantive judgment that “their primitive culture should be preserved.” It’s based on a policy of non-interference, in this case involving a need to undo her own crew's prior interference. You ask "who is she to decide"-- and I think she would agree with you. She DIDN'T decide. She didn't impose any new order on this world. She just left things as much the way she found them as possible.

    The thing about difficult ethical questions is that they don't always have a neat little answer; sometimes Star Trek writers are too ready to produce such "answers" and be smug about it too. In this case, I thought they did a decent job of articulating the lingering dilemma through Seven's uncertainty. I found Janeway's attitude to be pragmatic rather than arrogant, even if a little unsatisfying.

    BTW: I was SO RELIEVED that they didn’t turn this episode into a Seven-Chakotay “getting to know you” thing! I was dreading that.... Voyager focuses way too much on crew-member romantic entanglement. I can’t believe you WANTED another soap opera episode! Ugh.
  • From Hugo on 2016-04-14 at 3:32am:
    Great analysis and comment, Jadzia!

    This ep was too slow for my tastes. The b-plot wasn't that interesting, but slightly amusing and it tied up with the a-plot nicely in the end.

    I am interested in learning who erected the barrier, and why.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x23 - Homestead

Originally Aired: 2001-5-9

Synopsis:
Voyager discovers a Talaxian settlement. [DVD]

My Rating - 4

Fan Rating Average - 4.87

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 15 17 1 4 8 15 7 11 15 11 6

Problems
- Neelix says it is the 315th anniversary of the Vulcan first contact with Earth, but it's actually the 314th.

Factoids
None

Remarkable Scenes
- Tuvok's "hypothetical" advice to Neelix.
- Neelix leaving Voyager with his shuttle.
- Naomi: "Thanks, Neelix. But I can put myself to bed. I'm not a little girl anymore."
- Neelix' send off.

My Review
My first reaction to this episode... wow. Naomi looks a lot older since the last time we saw her. Funny how those kids just shoot right up in size. Well, the episode is adequate as a send off for Neelix, but unremarkable as an episode. I just felt that Neelix' character never got used to its full potential, so his send off didn't feel very meaningful. To be honest, I would have rather seen Neelix return to Earth with Voyager. But what's done is done. In a way, I'm glad the writers decided to give Neelix some closure. But it's always sad to see a long time character go. First Kes, now Neelix. It's not like he's really going anywhere though. With only three episodes of Voyager left, I'm sure he'll pop up again on long range communications. So again, the send off didn't feel very meaningful.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From adam on 2011-01-03 at 8:49am:
    Oh man. I saw the Tuvok dancing callback coming from a mile away, and I was totally hoping Tuvok would do some serious soft-shoeing hoopajoo action and completely break character. I had very high hopes. Instead, what I got was a little rhinestone curtsy. What a letdown. Oh well.
  • From Targ on 2014-06-20 at 6:27am:
    This episode never really made sense. Sure the Talaxians could flee their homeworld, but what are the chances of them travelling at the exact same trajectory as Voyager for a distance of 45,000 light years? And how did they get through major obstacles like 10 years of Borg space? Totally implausible. I'm surprised this isn't listed under 'problems'.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x24 - Renaissance Man

Originally Aired: 2001-5-16

Synopsis:
Janeway is held hostage. [DVD]

My Rating - 8

Fan Rating Average - 4.22

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 52 2 4 2 11 5 9 7 12 13 16

Problems
None

Factoids
None

Remarkable Scenes
- The doctor: "I'd never admit this to anyone else, but there was a time when I would have given anything to be flesh and blood. But I've come to realize that being a hologram is far superior."
- Janeway's freakishly weird behavior.
- Chakotay discovering Janeway is an impostor.
- The doctor pretending to be Torres.
- The doctor jumping through the wall and grabbing his mobile emitter. Nice!
- The doctor hiding in a sea of copies within the holodeck.
- The doctor as Torres defeating Tuvok.
- The doctor as a Hierarchy member.
- The doctor's program destabilizing.
- Tuvok and Tom retaking the Delta Flyer.
- The doctor's confessions.
- Torres casually explaining that she's fixed the doctor.

My Review
A lot of nice details in this episode. I was fond to see the return of the Hierarchy. Probably most amusing was the doctor's clever use of holographic technology. We get to see the Emergency Command Hologram again too. And we get some incredible special effects as well. I am particularly fond of all of the doctor's athletic maneuvers. There's no doubt that just about everything the doctor did in this episode was one blunder after another, but it made for such wonderful story. Like Voy: Workforce, this episode makes great use of Voyager's continuity. Voy: Renaissance Man remains one of my favorites of the season. Maybe one of the best performances of the doctor ever.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From g@g on 2012-01-25 at 3:32am:
    Ok, I'm not quite done with the episode but I think there's a bit of a problem here. On Voyager, the doc acts like he's Neo from the Matrix, aerial kung fu included... then when he's beamed onto the ex-hierarchy vessel, he's quiet and obedient as a lamb. Doesn't really square. That's not even mentioning the fact that photons should probably be able to pass through a force-field, no? Otherwise the forcefield would be opaque (I'm sure there's lots of examples of holograms and the doc in particular going through forcefields in previous episodes, I just can't quite list them at the moment - rather sure he's done so pretty much anytime he's confined someone in sickbay). So, his sudden powerlessness could've been tweaked or explained or something. Both otherwise awesome episode (so far).
  • From Vengeance on 2012-07-07 at 10:55am:
    Photons may be able to pass through a forcefield, but the Doctor's mobile emitter certainly couldn't.
  • From Rick on 2013-04-23 at 9:28pm:
    More treason from the doctor with no consequences. Special rights for oppressed minorities, where have I heard this before? I do agree with the reviewer that everything the doctor did was stupid but the episode was still pretty good.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x25 - Endgame, Part I

Originally Aired: 2001-5-23

Synopsis:
Admiral Janeway travels back in time. [DVD]

My Rating - 7

Fan Rating Average - 5.76

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 25 3 2 2 7 9 7 11 16 18 19

Problems
None

Factoids
- In the future, Harry Kim commands the U.S.S. Rhode Island.
- In the future, Admiral Janeway switches from coffee to tea.
- Some time between Voy: One Small Ship and Voy: Virtuoso on Stardate 53317, captain Janeway was abducted by an alien race called the Kellidians. I wonder why the writers didn't pick some other similar episode to reference instead of this made up occurrence.
- In the future, Naomi Wildman has a daughter, Sabrina.
- In the future, Miral Paris is an ensign in Starfleet.
- In the future, Seven of Nine and Chakotay will both die.

Remarkable Scenes
- Seeing Voyager flying over San Francisco.
- The doctor finally chose a name... Joe. I agree with Mr. Paris. Not the greatest choice!
- The doctor: "You're going to have a very healthy baby. But not tonight." Torres: "Tell me you're joking. You're experiencing false labor, lieutenant." Tom: "Again?" The doctor: "As I explained the last time, it's a common occurrence. Especially among Klingons." Torres: "I want this thing out of me! Now!" The doctor: "Misdirected rage. Another common occurrence among Klingons."
- Icheb defeating Tuvok at Kalto.
- Future Tuvok freaking out about Janeway leaving.
- Janeway arriving at the house of Korath.
- Voyager's near miss colliding with a Borg cube.
- Seven having the doctor eliminate Seven of Nine's emotion blocker first discovered in Voy: Human Error.
- Korath: "You question my honor?" Janeway: "If you were honorable, you wouldn't have changed the terms of our agreement."
- Janeway's heist. That's some shuttle!
- Admiral Janeway traveling back in time.
- Admiral Janeway giving captain Janeway orders.

My Review
Well, in the tradition of TNG: All Good Things and DS9: What You Leave Behind, another relationship between characters is made up on the spot. First it was Troi and Worf, then it was Ezri and Bashir, and now Seven and Chakotay. Granted, they've hinted at this relationship between Seven and Chakotay in Voy: Human Error and almost in Voy: Natural Law. Anyway, Endgame, Part I was a sufficiently entertaining episode. I am only slightly annoyed that Admiral Janeway seems to have no problem breaking all kinds of laws just to get her crew home a little faster. Though it seemed obvious Voyager was going to need some kind of major speed boost to make it home before in time for the finale. The 30,000 light years have to come from somewhere! ;)

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Tallifer on 2011-05-11 at 8:18pm:
    <sigh> I hate episodes wherein the cast have to walk around in old-people make-up: they all look so fake.

    At first I was terribly disappointed with most of the endings given to the characters (except for Tuvok's brilliant madness: that should have stayed), but I suppose since they never really happened we can hope that something more interesting happens in the next thirty years.

    Seven and Nine and Chakotay: in some ways true to life: it would have been too much of a fairytale for the Doctor or Eejeb to win her.

    Star Fleet looks so tired and boring in those new monochrome uniforms.

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Star Trek Voy - 7x26 - Endgame, Part II

Originally Aired: 2001-5-23

Synopsis:
Janeway tries to change Voyager's history. [DVD]

My Rating - 9

Fan Rating Average - 5.19

Rate episode?

Rating: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# Votes: 37 5 7 5 4 6 13 8 12 14 29

Problems
None

Factoids
- There are only six transwarp hubs in the galaxy.

Remarkable Scenes
- Admiral Janeway boarding Voyager.
- Admiral Janeway spilling details about Voyager's future to captain Janeway.
- Janeway: "Though I've had some strange experiences in my career, nothing quite compares to the sight of my future self briefing my officers on technology that hasn't been invented yet."
- Voyager deploying their new armor.
- Voyager shrugging off attacks by three Borg cube.
- Voyager destroying two Borg cubes.
- Voyager discovering the transwarp hub.
- Admiral Janeway spilling the beans to captain Janeway about all the bad stuff that'll happen to her crew.
- Admiral Janeway showing up in Unimatrix One.
- The Borg Queen assimilating admiral Janeway.
- Admiral Janeway infecting the Borg Collective with a neurolytic pathogen.
- Unimatrix One's destruction.
- The transwarp network's destruction.
- The Federation ships battling the Borg sphere.
- Voyager reaching the alpha quadrant.
- Janeway: "Set a course for home." Final line spoken on the show.

My Review
Why oh why didn't captain Janeway just stroll right on through the transwarp hub? We seriously didn't need this whole "have your cake and eat it too" crap. I would have much preferred that admiral Janeway had told captain Janeway about the hub first and had the argument over whether or not to destroy it or use it before entering the nebula. The admiral could then have convinced the captain to use it instead of destroy it, correcting the mistake she made in Voy: Caretaker. Yes, Janeway made a mistake. It would have been a massively awesome humbling experience to see her truly admit it by making the right choice. But no. The writers wanted more than that. The writers not only wanted Janeway to a deliver a major blow to the Borg, but to reach Earth while doing it. (You'll note that they did much the same thing in Voy: Night that they did in this episode.) Hell, the writers even almost saved it by having admiral Janeway "betray" captain Janeway. But again, nope. It was a farce! So in the end, a lot of time in the finale is wasted on this pointless contention between the Janeways and almost zero time is spent on Voyager's homecoming. I was profoundly disappointed that we didn't get to see family reunions, or even Voyager landing on Earth. We're not even told just what exactly happened to the Borg. The way its shown they could have been either extremely wounded or totally and utterly destroyed. They really should have clarified this. Not only that, but captain Janeway brought loads of technology from the future to Earth and we're not shown the repercussions of that at all! I've wanted to know since Voy: Future's End what the repercussions of the mobile emitter would be once Voyager reached Earth. Now we have futuristic stealth technology (which is banned in the Federation as far as I know since TNG: The Pegasus), some really kick ass armor technology, and "transphasic" torpedoes to contend with too! Don't get me wrong. I really liked Voy: Endgame. Maybe if we substituted Voy: Unimatrix Zero with Voy: Endgame and gave us a season of Voyager in the alpha quadrant, it would have been more fitting. But as I always say, what's done is done. We don't quite get the closure I hoped for like in DS9: What You Leave Behind, and the episode wasn't quite as good as TNG: All Good Things, but it was still a damn fine episode and a mostly fitting end for Star Trek Voyager.

The following are comments submitted by my readers.

  • From Wes on 2012-02-25 at 12:12pm:
    @kethinov, in your analysis of the Voyager series you said it was established in TNG that Borg space is between where Voyager was in the Delta quadrant and Federation space. Do you recall in which episode of TNG that was established? I'd love to watch that episode again. I always thought it was just a nice coincidence the writers came up with for Voyager to run into the Borg.

    Additionally, I like these two episodes. I'd probably give them both an 8 or 9 because I agree with you that they could have this episode for the end of season 4 or sometime soon thereafter. There are so many pointless fillers in Voy. But I may also be a bit jaded by my love of DS9's arcs and TNG's lack of needing to get somewhere (e.g. home).
  • From Kethinov on 2012-02-25 at 5:57pm:
    Wes,

    The first on-screen confirmation that the Borg are delta quadrant residents comes from the TNG film Star Trek: First Contact. However, fan speculation about the subject was commonplace as far back as the early 1990s and many non-canon novels quasi-established this as fact, which the producers of Star Trek were eventually inclined to absorb as canon.

    It was so common to assume this as canon that during Star Trek Voyager's pre-production phases in the early 1990s, Michael Okuda is reputed to have told Rick Berman that "since the gamma quadrant is the province of ships from DS9, [then] this new show [should] be set in the delta quadrant. One of the few things we know about the delta quadrant is that the Borg homeworld is located somewhere there. This might present opportunities for the Borg to be recurring bad guys."
  • From Wes on 2012-03-16 at 10:37am:
    After watching a lot of Voyager in the past little while--thank you, Netflix--I've noticed another gripe I have. Out of the three series I have really watched (TNG, DS9 and Voyager) Voyagers class is the weakest. In fact, I am often annoyed with the acting of Voyager's cast. I do not discredit their hard work, by any means. However, Jeri Ryan, Robert Picardo and Tim Russ are the only above-soap-opera-caliber actors on Voyager. I'll admit that some of my frustration may simply be due to the writing, but I counter that with the idea that I believe the writers write the characters to the actor's abilities.

    Since I wasn't alive during the run of TOS, it's hard for me to criticize their acting since I don't really know how it compared to the acting of the day. Although, I thought their acting was pretty good in Star Trek IV and VI.

    I feel quite secure in saying the actors of TNG were the best actors of all. They were each fabulous in their roles and in the movies. You could rarely say that it seemed like they were acting. Instead, it more often seemed like they actually were the character they portrayed.

    The DS9 cast is a close second to TNG's cast, for me.

    So, while I like some of Voyager's episodes (mostly the ones Kethinov has rated high), the acting annoys me far too often to be a really great series for me.
  • From Nightwish on 2014-12-14 at 9:41pm:
    Well... from having tried to watch it twice before and really not liking it to seeing it all in a year and feeling emotional in the end went quite a distance. Sure, some characters were annoying and never did anything right, and other's were inconsistent, but I felt happy for them all in the end. And I'll miss them.
    All and all, not a bad trek series after all. I wonder when we'll get something similar again.
    And I've found that I mostly agree with your likes and dislikes, which is nice.
  • From Dstyle on 2015-08-13 at 9:59am:
    Without any "reunion" scenes at the end of the episode, it definitely left me feeling like we, as invested viewers, were denied closure. After all the years trying to get back to Earth, we at least deserved a chance to see Tom reuniting with Admiral Paris, Tuvok's unemotional reunion with his wife and children, Seven's reunion with her Earth family, Harry's long-awaiting reunion with his fiance UH I MEAN PARENTS HIS PARENTS RIGHT I FORGOT WE ALL AGREED TO FORGET THAT HARRY WAS ENGAGED AT THE BEGINNING OF THE SERIES. Ending the series the way it did just left me feeling empty.
  • From Andrew on 2016-12-12 at 11:13am:
    I just finished watching the entire series on Saturday. After 172 episodes, I definitely enjoyed seeing the future versions of the characters since I feel a strong bond with each.

    For that same reason, I share Kethinov's disappointment that we don't see any of what occurs on Earth after they return. Yes, I understand that the show was about "the journey." Yes, I understand that you always want to leave viewers wanting more, but I could not shake the empty feeling that I got when the final shot of the show was Voyager approaching Earth from space.

    Voyager could have easily returned in mid to late season 5 (or even season 6) and then used season 6 and/or 7 to explore the crew's lives on Earth. How would Seven of Nine and the Doctor adjust to Earth? How would the new technology and experiences affect Starfleet? What kind of homecoming would the crew receive?

    Anyway...I loved the episode and I loved this series. Definitely captures the brilliance of TNG and DS9, but clearly not on the same level. I was just disappointed with the way they left it. Seemed so sudden!

Prove to me that you are a real person and not a spam robot by typing in the text of this image:

Return to season list